Targeted Color Adjustments in Photoshop

Photofocus (old site)

Learn how to easily make targeted color adjustments of a single object in Photoshop using selections, adjustment layers, and layer masks.

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Targeted Color Adjustments in Photoshop

Buttermilk Ranch – It’s a love / hate thing

Plate Fodder

…you know you do.

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Back just shy of 1950, there was this guy named Steve Henson. He was up in Alaska somewhere working, doing the bush people thing and cooking for his fellow bush people workers. It was during that mystical time he began developing a buttermilk based salad dressing (I’m assuming to put on their fireweed Caesars…or willow bark chop salads… or moose fodder carpaccio … .. . the whole mental image of bush people in Alaska sitting around a campfire, eating a honkin’ bowl of salad is just kinda funny.). He and his wife later moved to California, and opened a Dude Ranch called Hidden Valley. His formulated buttermilk dressing became the house dressing of the ranch.

It was so unique, so flavorful, everybody wanted the recipe. He began packaging up the mix and selling it…. Although to do that, the mix had to be diluted with non-food items (fillers…

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Buttermilk Ranch – It’s a love / hate thing

Carter Mountain

Added new work to my portfolio this morning:  it is titled “Carter Mountain in June.”  According to http://www.summitpost.org, which has the best description of Carter Mountain: Of the major summits in the Absaroka Range, there are relatively few that can be reached during a day hike; the ruggedness of the landscape and the small number of established trails make travel slow, and the healthy grizzly bear population deters many people from exploring these beautiful and unique mountains. The Southeast Absaroka Range in northwestern Wyoming is bordered on the north by a huge mountain that stretches for over thirty miles along the South Fork of the Shoshone River. While there at least thirteen unnamed summits with 300 feet of prominence along the long ridge, the entire peak (as well as the highest point) is known as Carter Mountain. Not only is Carter the largest mountain mass in the entire Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem, but its steep and pinnacled north face is one of the highest in any of DSC_0088_Paintingthe ranges of Wyoming or Montana, dropping 4,000 feet in one mile and 6,000 feet total to the river.

Carter Mountain

Mangiare!

Yesterday I successfully made an Italian Olive Oil cake.  The third time’s a charm, right?  The cake is similar in texture to cornbread; it’s soft in the center, and the edges- as well as bottom – are caramelized and delicious.  A Mascarpone frosting topped it off, with turbinado sugar sprinkled over the top.  In my opinion, this cake has a stand-alone flavor that is best experienced without any frosting; however, when has the lightness of Mascarpone frosting NOT been a fabulous compliment to any Italian dessert?

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This recipe comes from Genius Recipes, via FOOD52:

MAIALINO’S OLIVE OIL CAKE:
* 2 cups all-purpose flour
* 1 3/4 cup sugar
* 1 1/2 tsp. kosher salt
* 1/2 tsp. baking soda
* 1/2 tsp. baking powder
* 1 1/3 cup extra-virgin olive oil
* 1 1/2 cup whole milk
* 3 large eggs
* 1 1/2 Tbl. grated orange zest
* 1/4 cup fresh orange juice
* 1/4 cup Grand Marnier

1.  Heat oven to  350°F.  Oil, butter or spray a 9-inch cake pan that is at least 2 inches deep with cooking spray and line the bottom with parchment paper.  
2.  In a bowl, whisk the flour, sugar, salt, baking soda and powder.   In another bowl, whisk the olive oil, milk, eggs, orange zest, juice, and Grand Marnier.   Add the dry ingredients; whisk until just combined.
3.  Pour the batter into the prepared pan and bake for 1 hour, until the top is golden and a cake tester comes out clean.   Transfer the cake to a rack and let cool for 30 minutes. 
4.  Run a knife around the edge of the pan, invert the cake onto the rack and let cool completely, 2 hours.

Eat the cake with or without frosting.  Magiare!

Mascarpone frosting:

*  2 cups heavy whipping cream
*  1 tsp. vanilla
*  6 Tbl. confectioners sugar
*  8 oz container Mascarpone

Mix all indredients until peaks form.  I  chill my frosting after mixing, but this step is optional. 
That’s it, very simple.  “Easy peezy lemon squeezy!”

Mangiare!

The Stark Tree

This photo was taken two years ago around this same time– the end of Winter as snow clings tenaciously to the countryside.  It stood barren and alone, just waiting for one season to end and another to begin, ushering in the most beautiful season in Wyoming… a time of green hills and blooming wildflowers!  Let’s hear it for the survivors of Winter, such as this Stark Tree!

Stark Tree BW 2012
The Stark Tree, Copyright Lisa Holland-Gillem.
The Stark Tree

Pristine

Woke up this morning to a pristine Winter scene:  beautiful fresh piles of white snow, untouched by anything except the occasional deer track, covering the property.  The sun is shining so unless we get more fresh snow, it may be gone by tomorrow.  That’s the kind of storm I like– here to day, gone tomorrow!  Wyoming in Winter isn’t for the faint of heart!  #Winter, #snow, #Wyoming, #cold, #landscapes, #black and white, #photography.

Rock formations that resemble a crown by Wapiti, Wyoming.
Rock formations that resemble a crown by Wapiti, Wyoming.  Copyright Lisa Holland-Gillem
Pristine

Conform: Meaningful Folder Structures

Photofocus (old site)

This is part 4 of a series.  Be sure to check out 01. Organize Your Photos, 02. DAM Foundations and 03. Consolidate.


After consolidating source media on the DAM drives, everything is now in one place. Along the way, it is likely that some duplicate data has been created and some media has been copied that we really do not need. At this point, the DAM drives look something like this:

Establish A Naming Convention

Before cleaning the repository, one must be certain one can make accurate comparisons between folders. To do this, a standard naming convention for folders and files is required.

There is no silver bullet here. There are countless approaches to this problem. Many books have been written on the subject of Digital Asset Management (DAM). Some advocate against any renaming. Some insist that each individual file be renamed. At a minimum, following this guide…

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Conform: Meaningful Folder Structures